Prestige economy--DamNation (salmon runs in Spokane)--Google Maps perspective

by Jarrett Retz October 5th, 2018

“If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?” ― Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag Archipelago 1918-1956

Here is the trailerThe Inlander

Dive into the Spokane River with the Inlander's 2018 River Issue by Mitch Ryals Excerpt below;

1911

Little Falls Dam opens, with others to follow The first hydroelectric dam to block annual salmon runs on the Spokane River, located 29 miles downstream from the river's mouth at Lake Coeur d'Alene, went online in 1911. Without an effective fish ladder, all salmon runs above the dam thus ceased, preventing the Spokane Tribe and other tribal groups in the region from harvesting the fish that sustained their people for centuries. The final devastating blow to inland tribes' reliance on salmon runs came with the opening of Grand Coulee Dam in 1942, blocking salmon and steelhead from 1,140 miles of upstream rivers, including the Spokane. Today, seven total hydroelectric dams exist on the river, spanning from the Post Falls Dam to Little Falls in Lincoln County.

Troubled Waters by Jacob Jones Excerpt below;

Hunchbacked fins by the hundreds once cut the churning surface of a free-flowing, unspoiled Spokane River, its waters teeming with silvery chinook salmon for the legendary summer spawning runs of the late 19th century. As many as 1,000 salmon a day fell to the spears and traps of the Spokane Indians and other regional tribes. For generations, families and wildlife fed off the bounty. The river brought salmon, and the salmon brought life.1. The Coddling of the American Mind podcasts and discussions

Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff's new book has been released and they have done a couple of interviews talking about the basis for the book. This particular one posted below is with Jordan Peterson (who they have lots to agree with), but Haidt has also done a good podcast with Sam Harris as well. The podcast with Sam Harris is actually the one that details 'the prestige economy' more. They mention an interesting quote towards the end (which is apparently in the book) which comes from this longer quotation I believe;

“If only it were all so simple! If only there were evil people somewhere insidiously committing evil deeds, and it were necessary only to separate them from the rest of us and destroy them. But the line dividing good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being. And who is willing to destroy a piece of his own heart?”

― Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, The Gulag Archipelago 1918-1956

2. DamNation (2014) documentary. Here is the trailer

I've watched this documentary three times now, and I still think it's very well done. I'm not a fisherman, or a Monkey Wrencher, but this one pulls at me. What's strange is mentioning that there used to be a salmon run in the Spokane River to people from Spokane, and them being unaware of what it used to be.

So I decided to post links to couple of articles in The Inlander with a few quotations if that touches anyone's curiosity.

Dive into the Spokane River with the Inlander's 2018 River Issue by Mitch Ryals Excerpt below;

1911



Little Falls Dam opens, with others to follow



The first hydroelectric dam to block annual salmon runs on the Spokane River, located 29 miles downstream from the river's mouth at Lake Coeur d'Alene, went online in 1911. Without an effective fish ladder, all salmon runs above the dam thus ceased, preventing the Spokane Tribe and other tribal groups in the region from harvesting the fish that sustained their people for centuries. The final devastating blow to inland tribes' reliance on salmon runs came with the opening of Grand Coulee Dam in 1942, blocking salmon and steelhead from 1,140 miles of upstream rivers, including the Spokane. Today, seven total hydroelectric dams exist on the river, spanning from the Post Falls Dam to Little Falls in Lincoln County.

Troubled Waters by Jacob Jones Excerpt below;

Hunchbacked fins by the hundreds once cut the churning surface of a free-flowing, unspoiled Spokane River, its waters teeming with silvery chinook salmon for the legendary summer spawning runs of the late 19th century. As many as 1,000 salmon a day fell to the spears and traps of the Spokane Indians and other regional tribes. For generations, families and wildlife fed off the bounty. The river brought salmon, and the salmon brought life.

3. Google Maps perspective

I was recently looking at Denmark and Sweden on Google Maps, and as I clicked on the map to move the display in a certain direction, the perspective of how the Earth moved looked more like a globe. It appears to display the Earth more accurately taking into account the shape of the Earth and how different geographic coordinates relate.

Maybe this feature has been around for a while and I didn't notice, but still very cool.